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Johannesburg’s Top 10

It is has many names. Called Jobek, Egoli, Joeys and Jozi, it is the hub of the South African money making machine and home of the Stock Exchange. Johannesburg is the capital of Gauteng, the richest province in South Africa and the largest city (by population) in the country. more »

Posted in Travel Tips

South African sweet stuff

South Africans love their sweets – drinks, food or desserts.
Brandy and Coke, whiskey and apple juice, fruit juices and spirit coolers, we love them sweet drinks. Where it comes to foodstuffs, desserts are the main attraction on the menu. Baked puddings with ice cream, baked puddings with custard, baked puddings with ice cream and custard. more »

Posted in Stories

Car rental in South Africa: a brief guide

A self-drive safari in South Africa is a very popular way to see this vast country. You can choose your own departure time, schedule and route or book a self-drive tour through South Africa where accommodation is included. Choose the right vehicle and plan your route well. more »

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Kid friendly things to do in South Africa

A self-drive tour in South Africa is the best way to experience this country with your family. Driving distances are limited to about 300km per day and you can stop anywhere you want. Here are some tips on what to do with your kids while touring the Highlights of South Africa in a rental car. more »

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Food for Africa: what to eat in South Africa

South Africa is a stew of cultures, colours and race. With slaves, colonisation, wars and visitors, the country become the home of many peoples. And with people, came spices, ingredients and recipes. Curries and coconut came from India and the Far East, meats and open-fire grilling from the Afrikaners and black tribes. more »

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Victoria Falls from the sky

Victoria Falls – Mosi-o-Tunya – ‘The smoke that thunders’. This immense curtain of water in Zimbabwe is considered the largest waterfall on earth.  The mass of water, over a kilometer wide, tumbles over 100m into a crack in the earth and down into the Zambezi River. This river forms the border between Zambia and Zimbabwe and draws millions of visitors per year to enjoy the falls, white water rafting fishing and boat trips. more »

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Namibia’s best lodges for parents

Are we there yet? How far? I’m hungry!
You have heard it all.
Travelling with children of all ages has its challenges. But choosing a good lodge will help to ease tension and ensure everyone has a great holiday.  Namibia is a sparsely populated country with huge open spaces. This means that you will travel long distances to get to your next destination. So choose a lodge which offers a range of activities and is more than just a stop-over. more »

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Lodge review: Antbear Lodge

The new manager collapsed onto the sofa, a glass of red wine in hand. I need to up the marketing of this place; what word would you use to describe Antbear Lodge? We were nibbling on pre-dinner snacks and sipping wine while thinking of adjectives… more »

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5 things to do in Durban

Vist uShaka Marine World

It will be the best 4 hours spent. Buy a combo-ticket for both the aquarium (Sea World) and the waterslide park (Wet ‘n Wild) and visit the fishies first. The aquarium is the best in the country and housed underground in the wreck of a ship. You will see box fish, enormous sea urchins, sharks and sea horses. It is magnificent.
more »

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A cheetah encounter of a boring kind

She sat motionless, quiet. Her breathing was almost undetectable. Was sleeping? The sky was white in the summer heat, but the wooden pergola provided some shade. Suddenly she stirred on the little chair she was sitting on and moved her grip on the cheetah’s leash. The handler was tired and Enigma equally so. We kneeled down about half a meter from the sprawling animal. Unperturbed by our presence, he merely lifted his head a little and opened one eye. more »

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Lodge review: Plumbago

Carry the butternut!

The first thing she said to me was ‘carry the butternut’. We arrived at Plumbago B&B, 190km south of Durban just as Libby the owner, arrived from her shopping trip. With a huge smile and loaded with vegetables, she hugged us like old friends. Assisted by their two black Labradors, her husband Mike was unloading our baggage as fat drops of rain started pouring down. more »

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How to prepare for South Africa’s weather

South Africa is a sunny, dry country in southern most point of the African continent. It has a coastline of over 2500km and an inland plateau rising to almost 1600m above sea level. In the interior, mountain ranges dominate and rise to over 3400m high. South Africa has eight biomes or ecological life zones with each its own plant and animal life. Biomes range from desert and savannah, to fynbos and forest. Here is more about South Africa’s weather.
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Lodge review: Umdoni Guesthouse

Look out for the large cock, she directed. Turn there.

I was looking forward to seeing this grand feature, but we didn’t. It was dark when we found the little gravel road leading to Umdoni Guesthouse. It was only the next day when we woke up to green hills and pineapple fields when I spotted the said cock. It was a huge rooster on the side of the road opposite the elegant guesthouse’s turn off. more »

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How to braai the South African way

Braai; the grilling of meat on an open fire. It is a national past time, a culinary art form and for millions of South Africans, a weekly ritual.
The fire, the tools, the meat – all play an essential part to produce the ultimate feast. ‘Fire’ some prefer real acacia hard wood, while others made do with briquettes. ‘Meat’ range from a simple sausage to deboned leg of lamb and crayfish. more »

Posted in Stories

Lodge review: Bagatelle Kalahari Game Ranch, Namibia

I fell in love with the room, not the tame springbok. Granted, Skunky was cute with his thin rubbery lips and sweet little droppings on the Persian carpet. But what captured my heart was the springbok skin (printed) wall paper in my room… more »

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5 things I love about Namibia

The languages
This dry flat country on the southwestern side of Africa has been influenced by many cultures and tribes. Most significantly, German colonisation and a South African-Angolan war. Tribes have moved and traded and fought and now, after the dust have settled, the richness of the history remains.
The South and central parts of the country speak German and Afrikaans with some scatterings of Nama and black tribal languages. more »

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The Ostrich and the Steak

I inched closer, lifting my camera, slowly.  I was aware of the huge claw-like feet and waited, with closed eyes, for the kick. I was always waiting for the kick, imagining my stomach ripped open, tummies and livers and meters of intestines tumbling out. more »

Posted in Stories

Red bus Yellow bus

Not only London has them, Cape Town too. Except Cape Town’s are topless. These iconic double-decker red busses have been whisking guests and locals to attractions in an around the city for over five years.  But Cape Town’s Red bus is now better than ever. Well, the busses are as good as always, but the route is better. more »

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The cat and the tonic

It was afternoon and there were cars everywhere. Some bigger SUV’s parked on the pavements while small Asian cars pulled up on Disabled Parking bays. Vehicles’ contents spilled out, some stretching and yawning, others clutching babies or rearranging sweaty clothes. It was still damp hot. The white clouds were simmering in a white sky and cicadas were shrieking like boiling kettles.

more »

Posted in Stories

It gives me fever

It is the sound that drives me insane. If they could keep quiet, things will be so much easier for them. I would be able to tolerate them hovering over me at night, admiring my sleeping body and gentle, innocent smile. It would even be acceptable for them to extract some body fluids, leaving a little red welt and then leaving the room. But no. It is that incessant buzzing, the high pitched whining, the ceaseless zzzzzzzzzzzzzzznnning like a miniature flying hairdryer that makes me take the wet towel into my own hands. more »

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